Tag Archives: Scholarship

Gratitude, Diversity And Service Mark This Year’s Scholarship Winners

AAUW Honolulu celebrated its scholarship awardees during an Annual Scholarship Brunch and Recognition event at Honolulu’s Outrigger Canoe Club August 30, 2015. Twelve local women took advantage of $50,000 of financial assistance to pursue a variety of educational endeavors.

Of the 12 AAUW Honolulu Scholarship recipients, half are pursuing undergraduate degrees in areas ranging from social work and nursing to anthropology. Five recipients are pursuing graduate degrees in areas that include mental health counseling, psychology and social work. And one awardee – a private pilot – is using her funds to advance her aviation qualifications. We spoke at length with two of our awardees at the Annual Scholarship Brunch and Recognition event and would like to share a bit about them with you here.

Brianne Lyn Nagamine
Scholarship1Major: Social Work
University of Hawaii at Manoa
Expected Graduation: May 2017

What is important to you about receiving the AAUW Honolulu scholarship?
So far the biggest obstacle to pursuing my dream has been financial. Without the scholarship, I don’t know if I would have been able to pursue my degree. It puts me one-step so much closer to accomplishing my educational goals. Balancing school and work is really difficult as a single person making the scholarship particularly beneficial, but it’s also an honor. I’m connected to other women through AAUW in the community. The scholarship empowers women like me with a voice to create change. I am part of that community now.

An interesting fact about Brianne:

I have been a child welfare advocate for over five years with the Hawaii Foster Youth Coalition and Kids Hurt Too Hawaii. This past summer I had the privilege to intern in Senator Schatz office in D.C through the Congressional Coalition of Adoption Institute Foster Youth Internship Program. I will be going back to DC a week from now because I have received a grant to start up my own project that where I will continue to help foster youth heal from trauma and provide them with protective factors that can decrease their risk for suicide.

 Shannon Christensen
Scholarship2

Area of Study: Global Aviation Program
Utah Valley University, Global Online Student
Flight Training at Maui Aviators

What is important to you about receiving the AAUW Honolulu scholarship?
I earned my private pilot license with Tweet T. Coleman support, and am using this year’s scholarship award to complete my instrument training. The first obvious benefit to the scholarship is the financial help. The cost of training in Maui is among the highest in the nation. But the other thing that is important is in knowing that someone is believing in you and wants to support you. You cannot put a price on that. For me it’s motivating and confidence building to have this kind of a community to help. Now that I am a member of AAUW Maui I can pay it all forward which is important to me as well.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Applications for the 2016-2017 academic year will open on Tuesday, December 1, 2015. Early application deadline is Friday, January 29, 2016.  Applicants who turn in a completed application by the early application deadline will have their applications reviewed to verify if supporting documents have been submitted.  If not, students will have the opportunity to re-submit correct documents by the final deadline.

The application deadline for the AAUW Honolulu Branch Scholarship is 4:00pm (HST) on Thursday, February 18, 2016

Scholarship and Alumni News

SCHOLARSHIP NEWS

This is the first year Hawaii Community Foundation is administering our academic scholarships. HCF receives the applications and oversees the review process by a panel of community volunteers. The panel screens and selects applicants based on criteria provided by the AAUW Honolulu Branch Educational Foundation Trustees.

We met three of our awardees at the HCF awards brunch and would like to share a bit about them with you here. Part of the value of participating in the HCF application process is that our applicants are automatically considered for other scholarships that they qualify for administered by HCF. The three awardees at the HCF brunch reported that a total of seven additional scholarships were awarded to them outside of the AAUW Honolulu scholarship!

Jasmine Choy, Major: Social Work and Political Science, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Jasmine Choy

Jasmine Choy
Major: Social Work and Political Science
University of Hawaii at Manoa, Senior

What is important to you about receiving the AAUW Honolulu scholarship?
The scholarship helps me continue schooling and lessens the financial burden of how I am going to pay for school. I’m a single mom of four and I have to make money work for five of us. The scholarship gives me hope and encouragement that I’m on the right path and that someone finds value in me outside of myself. We all like to feel appreciated: I put a lot of effort into making sure I do well in school and this shows that my hard work pays off.

Alana Fuller Tanaka, Major: Nursing, Chaminade University

Alana Fuller Tanaka

Alana Fuller Tanaka
Major: Nursing
Chaminade University, Sophomore

What is important to you about receiving the AAUW Honolulu scholarship?
The scholarship is a big opportunity to continue my studies. Thinking about how I’m going to pay tuition is such a heavy burden. Having AAUW reach out to help means a lot. Sometimes it gets very overwhelming, both emotionally and mentally, when you’re on your own, and this scholarship will really help. I’m working two jobs, so the scholarship will help me be able to focus more on school.

Elisabeth Kurashige, Major: Counseling Psychology, Chaminade University

Elisabeth Kurashige

Elisabeth Kurashige
Major: Counseling Psychology
Chaminade University, Master’s program

Elisabeth has a Bachelor in Fine Arts in dance with a minor in psychology and teaches ballet and modern dance to both children and adults.

What is important to you about receiving the AAUW Honolulu scholarship?
From a financial standpoint, receiving the AAUW Honolulu Scholarship has been key in reducing the amount of debt I will have to accrue as a graduate student, which will be extremely beneficial as I look to start my career. Additionally, it is an honor to be associated with an organization that has such a widespread impact upon the education and vocation of women. I look forward to forging a connection with the AAUW and the inspiring empowerment that they accomplish.

ALUMNI NEWS

The scholarship committee is charged with maintaining an alumni outreach program. We have reached out to our alumni with an invitation to attend the Annual Scholarship Awards Brunch on August 30. We will be maintaining a list of past awardees and sharing news and information about them with you. This month we feature exciting news and a thank you letter from Rachel Hoerman PhD candidate in Anthropology (archeology) who received her award in 2014. As you can see, she is very talented and destined for greatness! She received our scholarship and an AAUW National Dissertation Fellowship, as well as a Fulbright. If you would like to participate on the scholarship committee click here to learn more about the committee and to contact the committee chair.

Art from Rachel Hoerman, 2014 AAUW Honolulu (HI) branch scholarship and 2015-16 AAUW American Fellowship awardee.

An enhanced digital image of ancient human cave drawings from Malaysian Borneo taken by Rachel Hoerman, 2014 AAUW Honolulu (HI) branch scholarship and 2015-16 AAUW American Fellowship awardee.

 

Letter from Rachel Hoerman, 2014 AAUW Honolulu (HI) branch scholarship and 2015-16 AAUW American Fellowship awardee.

Letter from Rachel Hoerman, 2014 AAUW Honolulu (HI) branch scholarship and 2015-16 AAUW American Fellowship awardee.

Letter from Rachel Hoerman, 2014 AAUW Honolulu (HI) branch scholarship and 2015-16 AAUW American Fellowship awardee.

Letter from Rachel Hoerman, 2014 AAUW Honolulu (HI) branch scholarship and 2015-16 AAUW American Fellowship awardee.

Postcard from Rachel Hoerman, 2014 AAUW Honolulu (HI) branch scholarship and 2015-16 AAUW American Fellowship awardee.

Postcard from Rachel Hoerman, 2014 AAUW Honolulu (HI) branch scholarship and 2015-16 AAUW American Fellowship awardee.

AAUW Campus Action Project Grant Leads to $10 Million Federal Grant

Windward Community College (WCC) leveraged a $5,000 Campus Action Project grant awarded by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) to successfully apply for a federal grant worth almost $10 million. The Title III grant awarded to WCC this fall will provide for childcare facilities on campus and expand on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics offerings at the campus.

The AAUW CAP grant provided funds in the spring semester for WCC to conduct a childcare survey and resource inventory to quantify the need for childcare services on campus and to existing identified resources available within the community.

“The AAUW survey made it possible to apply for the grant,” said Ardis Eschenberg, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at WCC. “The survey gave us concrete information of the state of need on campus and the specific population we should target. It was clear that our students were having problems finding care for infants and toddlers. For example, the resource inventory found that there were three open facilities in the area that served infants. The only one without a waiting list was very expensive at approximately $1,500 a month.” Eschenberg said.

“I’m in the honors society, I maintain stable grades, but between picking up my daughter and dropping her off, it has become inconvenient to attend the classes I need to graduate,” said Ashley Shankles, a student at WCC. “I’m a single working mom. I have three jobs, both on and off campus and take 21 credit hours, and if I get sick or she gets sick, I can’t afford rent. I need help.”

Marisa Ibrahim, another student at WCC, noted “It is very important for my preschool aged child to be in a steady, safe learning environment to enable me to focus on studying and attending college.”

Approximately $5.2 million of the grant will be allocated to childcare on campus over 5 years. The first two and a half years will be spent renovating an existing building to the specific requirements of caring for infants and toddlers.

Eschenberg emphasized the critical role the AAUW survey played in applying for the grant, “Because I knew the specific needs of our students from the survey, I could look up the building codes, get the specific square footage required for infants and toddlers, estimate staffing costs much more accurately and was able to write a very precise grant all within the space and time limit of the grant.”

After facilities have been renovated and staffed, childcare will be provided to student parents at no charge during the remaining term of the grant. Depending on the mix of childcare services provided, up to 28 children could be served in the new facility.

Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success research report cover

AAUW’s recent research, Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success, found limited access to childcare disrupts the educational path of many mothers. Student parents consistently cite childcare responsibilities as a chief reason for dropping out of community college before completing a degree or certificate.

“It is just hard to attend classes when my children’s school is on break. It does not coincide with WCC breaks,” agreed WCC student Michelle Muromachi.

“We are very excited to be able to provide childcare facilities on campus. Our students have waited long enough – it’s been 42 years!” said Eschenberg.

Windward Community College (WCC) leveraged a $5,000 Campus Action Project grant awarded by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) to successfully apply for a federal grant worth almost $10 million. The Title III grant awarded to WCC this fall will provide for childcare facilities on campus and expand on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics offerings at the campus.

The AAUW CAP grant provided funds in the spring semester for WCC to conduct a childcare survey and resource inventory to quantify the need for childcare services on campus and to existing identified resources available within the community.

“The AAUW survey made it possible to apply for the grant,” said Ardis Eschenberg, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at WCC. “The survey gave us concrete information of the state of need on campus and the specific population we should target. It was clear that our students were having problems finding care for infants and toddlers. For example, the resource inventory found that there were three open facilities in the area that served infants. The only one without a waiting list was very expensive at approximately $1,500 a month.” Eschenberg said.

“I’m in the honors society, I maintain stable grades, but between picking up my daughter and dropping her off, it has become inconvenient to attend the classes I need to graduate,” said Ashley Shankles, a student at WCC. “I’m a single working mom. I have three jobs, both on and off campus and take 21 credit hours, and if I get sick or she gets sick, I can’t afford rent. I need help.”

Marisa Ibrahim, another student at WCC, noted “It is very important for my preschool aged child to be in a steady, safe learning environment to enable me to focus on studying and attending college.”

Approximately $5.2 million of the grant will be allocated to childcare on campus over 5 years. The first two and a half years will be spent renovating an existing building to the specific requirements of caring for infants and toddlers.

Eschenberg emphasized the critical role the AAUW survey played in applying for the grant, “Because I knew the specific needs of our students from the survey, I could look up the building codes, get the specific square footage required for infants and toddlers, estimate staffing costs much more accurately and was able to write a very precise grant all within the space and time limit of the grant.”

After facilities have been renovated and staffed, childcare will be provided to student parents at no charge during the remaining term of the grant. Depending on the mix of childcare services provided, up to 28 children could be served in the new facility.

AAUW’s recent research, Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success, found limited access to childcare disrupts the educational path of many mothers. Student parents consistently cite childcare responsibilities as a chief reason for dropping out of community college before completing a degree or certificate.

“It is just hard to attend classes when my children’s school is on break. It does not coincide with WCC breaks,” agreed WCC student Michelle Muromachi.

“We are very excited to be able to provide childcare facilities on campus. Our students have waited long enough – it’s been 42 years!” said Eschenberg.