Tag Archives: Membership

AAUW Honolulu Branch Steinway Grand Piano Finds a New Home

Jazz2JazzThe AAUW Honolulu Branch Steinway Grand piano, for many years a feature of the Laulima House, has found a new home at Windward Community College. Photos were taken at An Evening of Hawaiian Jazz January 14, 2015 in the Hawaiian Studies Hale. The evening was a benefit for the Hawai’i Music Institute, celebrating the 2015 Music Series and arrival of the Windward Community College Steinway Grand piano. The event featured: Teresa Bright, singer and Hawaiian jazz musician, William Klingelhoffer, French horn and Ka‘ala Carmack, Windward CC Music Instructor and Director of the Hawai‘i Music Institute. The piano will be used for classes in Hawaiian music, chorus and voice.

AAUW Campus Action Project Grant Leads to $10 Million Federal Grant

Windward Community College (WCC) leveraged a $5,000 Campus Action Project grant awarded by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) to successfully apply for a federal grant worth almost $10 million. The Title III grant awarded to WCC this fall will provide for childcare facilities on campus and expand on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics offerings at the campus.

The AAUW CAP grant provided funds in the spring semester for WCC to conduct a childcare survey and resource inventory to quantify the need for childcare services on campus and to existing identified resources available within the community.

“The AAUW survey made it possible to apply for the grant,” said Ardis Eschenberg, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at WCC. “The survey gave us concrete information of the state of need on campus and the specific population we should target. It was clear that our students were having problems finding care for infants and toddlers. For example, the resource inventory found that there were three open facilities in the area that served infants. The only one without a waiting list was very expensive at approximately $1,500 a month.” Eschenberg said.

“I’m in the honors society, I maintain stable grades, but between picking up my daughter and dropping her off, it has become inconvenient to attend the classes I need to graduate,” said Ashley Shankles, a student at WCC. “I’m a single working mom. I have three jobs, both on and off campus and take 21 credit hours, and if I get sick or she gets sick, I can’t afford rent. I need help.”

Marisa Ibrahim, another student at WCC, noted “It is very important for my preschool aged child to be in a steady, safe learning environment to enable me to focus on studying and attending college.”

Approximately $5.2 million of the grant will be allocated to childcare on campus over 5 years. The first two and a half years will be spent renovating an existing building to the specific requirements of caring for infants and toddlers.

Eschenberg emphasized the critical role the AAUW survey played in applying for the grant, “Because I knew the specific needs of our students from the survey, I could look up the building codes, get the specific square footage required for infants and toddlers, estimate staffing costs much more accurately and was able to write a very precise grant all within the space and time limit of the grant.”

After facilities have been renovated and staffed, childcare will be provided to student parents at no charge during the remaining term of the grant. Depending on the mix of childcare services provided, up to 28 children could be served in the new facility.

Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success research report cover

AAUW’s recent research, Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success, found limited access to childcare disrupts the educational path of many mothers. Student parents consistently cite childcare responsibilities as a chief reason for dropping out of community college before completing a degree or certificate.

“It is just hard to attend classes when my children’s school is on break. It does not coincide with WCC breaks,” agreed WCC student Michelle Muromachi.

“We are very excited to be able to provide childcare facilities on campus. Our students have waited long enough – it’s been 42 years!” said Eschenberg.

Windward Community College (WCC) leveraged a $5,000 Campus Action Project grant awarded by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) to successfully apply for a federal grant worth almost $10 million. The Title III grant awarded to WCC this fall will provide for childcare facilities on campus and expand on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics offerings at the campus.

The AAUW CAP grant provided funds in the spring semester for WCC to conduct a childcare survey and resource inventory to quantify the need for childcare services on campus and to existing identified resources available within the community.

“The AAUW survey made it possible to apply for the grant,” said Ardis Eschenberg, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at WCC. “The survey gave us concrete information of the state of need on campus and the specific population we should target. It was clear that our students were having problems finding care for infants and toddlers. For example, the resource inventory found that there were three open facilities in the area that served infants. The only one without a waiting list was very expensive at approximately $1,500 a month.” Eschenberg said.

“I’m in the honors society, I maintain stable grades, but between picking up my daughter and dropping her off, it has become inconvenient to attend the classes I need to graduate,” said Ashley Shankles, a student at WCC. “I’m a single working mom. I have three jobs, both on and off campus and take 21 credit hours, and if I get sick or she gets sick, I can’t afford rent. I need help.”

Marisa Ibrahim, another student at WCC, noted “It is very important for my preschool aged child to be in a steady, safe learning environment to enable me to focus on studying and attending college.”

Approximately $5.2 million of the grant will be allocated to childcare on campus over 5 years. The first two and a half years will be spent renovating an existing building to the specific requirements of caring for infants and toddlers.

Eschenberg emphasized the critical role the AAUW survey played in applying for the grant, “Because I knew the specific needs of our students from the survey, I could look up the building codes, get the specific square footage required for infants and toddlers, estimate staffing costs much more accurately and was able to write a very precise grant all within the space and time limit of the grant.”

After facilities have been renovated and staffed, childcare will be provided to student parents at no charge during the remaining term of the grant. Depending on the mix of childcare services provided, up to 28 children could be served in the new facility.

AAUW’s recent research, Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success, found limited access to childcare disrupts the educational path of many mothers. Student parents consistently cite childcare responsibilities as a chief reason for dropping out of community college before completing a degree or certificate.

“It is just hard to attend classes when my children’s school is on break. It does not coincide with WCC breaks,” agreed WCC student Michelle Muromachi.

“We are very excited to be able to provide childcare facilities on campus. Our students have waited long enough – it’s been 42 years!” said Eschenberg.

Half the Rainbow: 2014 AAUW Hawaii State Convention

Half the Rainbow was the theme for AAUW-Hawaii’s state convention held April 25-27th in Honolulu. Hosts Windward Oahu planned a wonderful gathering which was attended by 56 members representing all seven branches. On Saturday, Dr. Susan Wurtzburg spoke about domestic violence; AAUW Director Charmen Goehring provided a report from national about research and advocacy; Leadership Chair Janet Morse led a session directed at avoiding leadership burn-out; and the day ended with a Pau Hana (Happy Hour) at the Mai Tai Bar.

On Sunday, Dr. Nancie Caraway, First Lady of Hawaii, spoke about human trafficking at the Installation Brunch. Joanna Amberger was thanked for her 2 years as co-president, and Jamie Pardau was installed as president for 2014-2016.

Many thanks to Gretchen Gould, Convention Chair, and Sherry Butler, Windward Oahu president. And a special thanks to Jacquie Maly, Hospitality Chair, who led the proceedings with humor and efficiency! She even had a challenging project for the women to work on at the final session. It was a week-end of inspiration, education, and fun with old and new friends.